What is the relationship between the statements “Thou shalt not kill” and “George Washington was the first president of the United States of America”? Both purport to state facts–but are they equally true facts? Many have certainly thought so, from the writers of the Bible (“Your righteousness is righteous forever, and your law is true” -Psalm 119:142, ESV) to prominent atheist Michael Ruse (“The man who says that it is morally acceptable to rape little children is just as mistaken as the man who says two plus two equals five”). Nevertheless, affirming such self-evident truths is unthinkable for today’s postmodernists–clearly, they insist, moral obligations are simply subjective preferences foisted upon individuals by the power-hungry leaders of their cultures. On this view, the humans with the greatest power become little gods, intimidating but minuscule compared to the ultimate God, power itself. Frighteningly, though, this bizarre compartmentalism has the potential to destroy not only moral truth but indicative truth as well because of its abandonment of the theological foundation of truth.

As discussed in the previous post on this blog, truth relies for its validity upon the infinite, eternal mind of God, which, due to God’s immutable nature, necessarily ensures the eternality of truth. How, then, is imperative truth related to the nature of God? To begin, even if morality is simply a human construction, the propositions describing these arbitrary moral prescriptions must be eternally true in the same way that any fact about the physical world is true because of God’s eternal knowledge of all facts.

Yet to assert only this much and proceed no further is blatantly unbiblical. Does not Scripture resound with the truths of God’s goodness and mercy (Psalm 145:9), His uprightness and justice (Deuteronomy 32:4), and, above all, His faithfulness and love (Psalm 25:10)? Yes, the truths of our physical world are important to and dependent on God, but they touch only the domain of His mind. The truths we call morality, however, touch His very heart and reflect the eternal, incomprehensible bonds of the truest love that unite the Holy Trinity.

Necessarily, then, if we humans render subjective the moral truths that govern not only our universe but the very Godhead, are we not in grave danger of abandoning the reliability of the factual truth imparted to us from God’s knowledge? Rather than being less sure or significant than so-called “factual” truths, imperative truths are equally or perhaps more unshakable because of their indivisibility from God’s character. More sadly still, by thus relinquishing moral truth, we lose not only our certainty of reality–we also abandon our profound God-given key into the heart of our Maker.

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